Aberporth Holiday Cottage


Estyn-y-Mor
Coastal Holiday Cottage
Aberporth, West Wales
Aberporth is a popular seaside village in West Wales. An ideal place for your next holiday.

Local Beaches

There are many fantastic beaches along the West Wales coastline. With sweeping sands and pebbly coves, you are sure to find somewhere perfect to visit. Explore rock pools, build sandcastles, catch some waves on a board, or just dip you toes in, there is something for everyone.

Aberporth

Aberporth is a picturesque village situated just six miles north of Cardigan on the Ceredigion coastline in South West Wales. The charm and friendly atmosphere of this seaside village, along with its two golden sandy beaches, make Aberporth a desirable destination for holiday makers during the summer months.

The beaches at Aberporth have been awarded the European Blue Flag status and provide the perfect location for sunbathers, swimmers, and canoeists. Low tide also provides the opportunity for children to explore the rock pools. Both beaches are equipped with life buoys, whilst the southern-most beach is normally patrolled by a Life Guard during the summer school holiday period.

Aberporth also offers an ideal base for walkers wishing to explore the Ceredigion Coast Path which stretches southwards to Cardigan and northwards to the beaches of Tresaith, Penbryn, Llangrannog, and New Quay. The path offers spectacular cliff top views across Cardigan Bay and the opportunity to spot bottle-nosed dolphins and grey seals which frequent these waters in the summer months. The first section of the recently improved path to Tresaith is wheelchair friendly and features a number of railway carriage holiday homes dotted along the landscape.

Aberporth

Tresaith

Tresaith is a coastal village in the Welsh county of Ceredigion. Tresaith is between Aberporth and Llangranog; it is linked to by a two-mile coastal path. Situated in West Wales, Tresaith is part of the Ceredigion Heritage Coastline which although not as well known as the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park offers similar walking and views. There is an abundance of wildlife and flora. Many kinds of seabirds can be spotted and regular sightings of grey seals are made.

Cardigan Bay is most famous for its resident bottle-nosed dolphin population. Dolphins can be sighted most days of the summer from the beach at Tresaith.

There is an active sailing club in Tresaith, the "Tresaith Mariners" with a mixed fleet of dinghies and catamarans. Visiting sailors are welcome to join in. Racing takes place on most Sundays throughout the season, with a safety boat on hand. Tresaith is a popular location for surfing too. In the right conditions, sets can reach 2 metres in height. Winter time provides best conditions for enthusiastic surfers. There is a surf shop close at hand to cater for all equipment needs or post-surf refreshment.

Tresaith

Penbryn

Penbryn is a village on the coast of Ceredigion in Wales, some ten miles up the coast from Cardigan. It consists mostly of farms and caravan sites. Penbryn Beach is owned by the National Trust and was used for location filming for the James Bond film Die Another Day.

Near the village is the Corbalengi Stone, a monument of the Early Christian period inscribed: "CORBALENGI IACIT ORDOVS". "Ordovs" is generally agreed to be the local tribe the Ordovices but "Corbalengi" is not found elsewhere, and there are many theories as to the significance of the inscription.

Penbryn

Llangrannog

Llangrannog is a small, coastal village and seaside resort in Ceredigion, Wales, seven miles south of New Quay. According to the United Kingdom Census 2001, the population of Llangrannog was then 796 people. Also, the census reveals that 51.8% of the population speak Welsh fluently, with the highest percentage of speakers being in the 15-19 age group, where 100% are able to speak Welsh.

It lies in the narrow valley of the little River Hawen, which falls as a waterfall near the middle of the village.

Llangrannog

Mwnt

Mwnt is a very small community and ancient parish in south Ceredigion, Wales, on the Irish Sea coast about 4.5 miles from Cardigan. It gets its name from the prominent steep conical hill, a landmark from much of Cardigan Bay, that rises above the beach.

It was the site of an unsuccessful invasion by Flemings in 1155, and its defeat was long afterwards celebrated on the first Sunday in January as "Sul Coch y Mwnt". It is said[by whom?] that the bones of the defeated invaders would occasionally be visible under the sand when uncovered by windy conditions in the early 20th century.

The Church of the Holy Cross (Welsh: Eglwys y Grog) is an example of a medieval sailor's chapel of ease. The site is said to have been used since the Age of the Saints, but the present building is probably 14th century. It has an example of a 12th or 13th century font made of Preseli stone. Mwnt was a civil parish in its own right for several centuries, but before the 17th century it was a detached chapelry of the parish of Llangoedmor. Since 1934, it has been part of the parish of Y Ferwig.

The beach, but not the church, is owned by the National Trust who exercise a conservation remit over both. The Irish Sea off Mwnt is rich in wildlife, being a regular sum

Mwnt

 
Estyn-Y-Mor, Aberporth, Cardigan, Ceredigion, SA43 2EP Tel:
aberporthholidaycottage.co.uk - Mon 23 Oct 2017 10:49:55